Der Jasager (He Who Says Yes): Opera in Two Acts / Dei Neinsager (He Who Says No)

Der Jasager (He Who Says Yes): Opera in Two Acts / Dei Neinsager (He Who Says No)

About

With: Kelly Jordan Bit*, Lexine Bondoc*, Richard Ceraulo, Elizabeth Chiang*, Timothy Ford Murphy*, Lydia Gaston*, Ching Gonzalez*, Peter Kim*, Thomas Kouo*, Alan Muraoka*, Eileen Rivera*

Directed by Jean Randich

Run

March 5 – March 27, 1999
The Connelly Theatre
220 East 4th Street (between Avenues A & B)
New York, NY

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Production Staff

H.M. Potts: Translation
Miriam Daly: Musical Director
Klara Zieglerova: Set Designer
Stephen Petrilli: Lighting Designer
Elly van Horne: Costume Designer
Robert Murphy: Sound Designer
Casey Koh: Flyer Designer
Sam Rudy/Shirley Herz Associates: Publicist
Mark Joseph Lawrence: Assistant Stage Manager
Cristina Sison: Assistant Stage Manager
Deniz Akyurek: Sound Engineer
Tony Rust: Technical Director
Jennifer Acomb: Sound Board Operator
Ann-Marie Brady: Electrician
Danielle Maul: Electrician
Erika Hughes: Wardrobe
Lesly Romero: Box Office Manager
Andy Schilling: Box Office Manager
Kristin Jones: House Manager
Anthony Ferrer: Crew
John Brophy: Scenic Painter
Laurie Mead: Scenic Painter
Courtney Phelps: Stage Manager

Photos

Der Jasager (He Who Says Yes): Opera in Two Acts / Dei Neinsager (He Who Says No)

Notes

Used by arrangement with Stefan Brecht, and arrangement with European American Music Corporation, agent for the Kurt Weill Foundation

** Ms. Bondoc performed March 5-12 and March 23-27. Ms.Bit performed March 3-21.

The following note is excerpted from an essay by Brecht on “The German Drama: pre-Hitler.” published in English in Left Review, London, July 1936. The full text appears in Brecht on Theatre, translated and edited by John Willett, Methuen, 1964.

Briefly the Aristotelian play is essentially static; its task is to show’ the world as it is. The learning play (Lehrstuck) is essentially dynamic; its task is to show the world as it changes (and also how it may be changed). It is a common truism among the producers and writers of the former type of play that the audience, once it is in the theatre, is not a number of individuals but a collective individual, a mob, which must be and can be reached only through its emotions; that it has the mental immaturity and the high emotional suggestibility of a mob. We have often seen this pointed out in treatises on the writing and production of plys. The latter theatre holds that the audience is a collection of individuals, capable of thinking and of reasoning of making judgments even in the theatre; it treats it as individuals of mental and emotion al maturity, and believes it wishes to be so regarded

What we must learn above all is consent.
Many say yes, and yet there is no consent.
Many are not asked, and many
Consent to wrong things. Therefore:
What we must learn above all is consent.

Brecht, He Who Says Yes/He Who Says No

Those who see all creatures in themselves
And themselves in all creatures know no fear.
Those who see all creatures in themselves
And themselves in all creatures know no grief.
How can the multiplicity of life
Delude the one who sees its unity?

The Upanishads

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