The Harmfulness of Tobacco / A Phoenix Too Frequent: Two One-Acts

The Harmfulness of Tobacco / A Phoenix Too Frequent: Two One-Acts

About

With: James Saito*, Michi Barall*, Joel Carino*, Mia Katigbak*

Directed by Stephen Stout

Run

May 26, 2000 – June 17, 2000

The Mint Theatre
311 West 43rd Street, 5th Floor
New York, NY

Tickets $15 TDF vouchers & VISA/MC accepted

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Production Staff

Sarah Lambert: Set Design
Stephen Petrilli: Lighting Design
Elly van Horne: Costume Design
Alan Spaulding: Technical Director
Thomas Kail: Assistant to the Director
Timothy Ford Murphy: Assistant Stage Manager
Laura Ma: Box Office Manager
Mel Duane Gionson: House Manager
Casey Koh: Flyer Design
Sam Rudy/Shirley Herz Associates: Publicity
Janine L. Pangburn: Stage Manager

Photos

James Saito
James Saito
(Photographer: Sarah Lambert)

Joel Carino and Michi Barall
Joel Carino and Michi Barall
(Photographer: Sarah Lambert)

Michi Barall and Mia Katigbak
Michi Barall and Mia Katigbak
(Photographer: Sarah Lambert)

James Saito
James Saito
(Photographer: Carol Rosegg)

Joel Carino and Michi Barall
Joel Carino and Michi Barall
(Photographer: Carol Rosett)

Notes

A PHOENIX TOO FREQUENT and THE HARMFULNESS OF TOBACCO are a unique combination and a perfect celebration of a unique company’s 10th anniversary. We hope you will join us for an evening of laughter as we inaugurate another decade of important work.

A Phoenix Too Frequent was written for and performed at the Mercury Theatre in London in 1946. It is “not only positive, but positively ebullient. Although Phoenix takes place entirely in a tomb, the dead body of its new occupant lying covered upstage throughout, the vitality and energy of life dispel the potential gloom of this situation.” (Glenda Leeming, 1990)

“Fry has written his most impressive play… The play’s symbolism is effectively embodied in its metaphorical chiaroscuro of day and night, death and life, demonstrating the resurrection of love, the Phoenix, from its ashes and new love from a dead husband’s corpse.” (Emil Roy, 1968)

“Out of the conventional laughingstock of the hen-pecked husband Chekhov creates a character who is completely three-dimensional, and the balance between pathetic and comic is seen very clearly in the characterization.” (Vera Gottlieb, 1982)

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