A Number

A Number

About

Since the arrival of Dolly the sheep, the first mammal to be cloned, in the late-90s, the possibility of human cloning has sparked controversy. In recent years, with advances in genetic engineering, the practical and ethical issues regarding cloning continue to make headlines and incite lively debate. “We’ve got ninety-nine percent the same genes as any other person. We’ve got ninety per cent as a chimpanzee. We’ve got thirty percent the same as lettuce,” says Michael Black in A Number. “Does that cheer you up at all? It makes me feel I belong.”

With: Joel de la Fuente*, James Saito*

Directed by Maureen Payne-Hahner

Run

March 12, 2011 – April 3, 2011
Tuesdays – Fridays at 7:30pm
Saturdays at 3:00pm & 7:30pm
Sundays at 2:00pm

Cherry Lane Studio Theatre
38 Commerce Street

Telecharge
Tickets: $25 ($20 previews March 12-13)
(212) 239-6200
(800) 432-7250

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Production Staff

Mia Katigbak: Artistic Producing Director
Christoph Hahner: Co-Producer
Czerton Lim: Set Designer
Kate Brown: Sound Designer
Alex Bright: Lighting Designer
Maureen Payne-Hahner: Costume Designer
Matthew Grayson: Graphic Designer
Sam Rudy Media Relations: Publicity
Clara Dalzell: Stage Manager

Reviews

Like all NAATCO undertakings, A Number is done with skill and grace and an uncommon concern for shining a light on our moral obligation to be worthy residents of this particular patch of space and time. Highly recommended.

(Scott Stiffler: Chelsea Now)

A Number — particularly when realized as well as it is here — remains a fascinating study of second chances and their consequences. De la Fuente gives an impressive performance as three very different variations on the same man.

(Dan Bacalzo: Theatermania)

Mr. Saito does a great job of opening up only as much as he is forced to … an excellent job with the role. I recommend A Number, a thought provoking and interesting look at personality and humanity. ┬áThe show uses cloning not as a gimmick, but as a tool to investigate our uniqueness and commonality.

(Reviews Off Broadway: )

Maureen Payne-Hahner’s stop-and-start direction emphasizes the play’s episodic structure. Czerton Lim’s set includes wall panels that initially resemble abstract patterns, but reveal themselves to be DNA sequences. It’s a subtle underscoring of the play’s themes, and it’s effective.

(Mark Sullivan: Capital New York)

Photos

James Saito
James Saito
(Photographer: William P. Steele)

James Saito and Joel de la Fuente
James Saito and Joel de la Fuente
(Photographer: William P. Steele)

Joel de la Fuente
Joel de la Fuente
(Photographer: William P. Steele)

James Saito and Joel de la Fuente
James Saito and Joel de la Fuente
(Photographer: William P. Steele)

James Saito and Joel de la Fuente
James Saito and Joel de la Fuente
(Photographer: William P. Steele)

James Saito and Joel de la Fuente
James Saito and Joel de la Fuente
(Photographer: William P. Steele)

Notes

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French Inc, New York City

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